Lectio Divina – Second Sunday of Lent

Catena Aurea, 2nd Weekend of Lent (B), Mk 9:2-10

Theophylact (1055-1107): Again, mystically; after the end of this world, which was made in six days, Jesus will take us up (if we be His disciples) into a high mountain, that is, into heaven, where we shall see His exceeding glory.

St. John Chrysostom (c. 347-407): Hom. in Matt., 56: He brings Moses and Elijah before them; first, indeed, because the multitudes said that Christ was Elijah, and one of the Prophets. He shows Himself to the Apostles with them, that they might see the difference between the Lord and His servants. And again because the Jews accused Christ of transgressing the law, and thought Him a blasphemer, as if He arrogated to Himself the glory of His Father, He brought before them those who shone conspicuous in both ways; for Moses gave the Law, and Elijah was zealous for the glory of God; for which reason neither would have stood near Him, if He had been opposed to God and to His law. And that they might know that He holds the power of life and of death, He brings before them both Moses who was dead, and Elijah who had not yet suffered death. Furthermore He signified by this that the doctrine of the Prophets was the schoolmaster to the doctrine of Christ (Gal 4:2)1. He also signified the junction of the New and Old Testament, and that the Apostles shall be joined in the resurrection with the Prophets, and both together shall go forth to meet their common King.

The Venerable Bede (672/3-735): If the transfigured humanity of Christ and the society of but two saints seen for a moment, could confer delight to such a degree that Peter would, even by serving them, delay their departure, how great a happiness will it be to enjoy the vision of Divinity amidst choirs of Angels forever?

Now because Peter sought for a material tent, he was covered with the shadow of the cloud, that he might learn that in the resurrection they are to be protected not by the covering of houses, but by the glory of the Holy Spirit.

Wherefore it goes on, “There was a cloud that overshadowed them.” And the reason why they obtained no answer from the Lord was that they asked unadvisedly; but the Father answered for the Son. Wherefore there follows, “And a voice came out of the cloud, saying, This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”

And we must observe, that, as when the Lord was baptized in Jordan, so on the mountain, covered with brightness, the whole mystery of the Holy Trinity is declared. . . Nor is it without reason that the Holy Spirit appeared here in a bright cloud, there in the form of a dove; because he who now with a simple heart keeps the faith which he has embraced, shall then contemplate what he had believed with the brightness of open vision.

1 Galatians 4:1-5  I mean that the heir, as long as he is a child, is no better than a slave, though he is the owner of all the estate;  2 but he is under guardians and trustees until the date set by the father.  3 So with us; when we were children, we were slaves to the elemental spirits of the universe.  4 But when the time had fully come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law,  5 to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.

Ralph Martin visits the Studium in Dublin

Spiritual writer Ralph Martin visited the Dominican Studium in St. Saviour’s Dublin after he gave a lecture at the Divine Mercy Conference last weekend.

The brothers are grateful to the organisers of the Divine Mercy Conference for allowing him to speak to us after his presentation at the conference.

Lectio Divina – First Sunday of Lent

St. John Chrysostom (c. 347-407), Hom. in Matt., xiii: Because all that Christ did and suffered was for our teaching, He began after His baptism to dwell in the wilderness, and fought against the devil, that every baptized person might patiently sustain greater temptations after His baptism, and not be troubled, as if what happened to Him was contrary to His expectation, but might bear up against all things, and come off conqueror. For although God allows that we should be tempted for many other reasons, yet for this cause also He allows it, that we may know, that man when tempted is placed in a station of greater honour. For the Devil does not approach except where he has seen someone set in a place of greater honour; and therefore it is said, “And immediately the Spirit drove Him into the wilderness.” And the reason why He does not simply say that He went into the wilderness, but was driven, is that you may understand that it was done according to the word of Divine Providence. By which also He shows that no man should thrust himself into temptation, but that those who from some other state are as it were driven into temptation, remain conquerors.

The Venerable Bede (672/3-735): But He was tempted forty days and forty nights that He might show us that as long as we live here and serve God, whether prosperity smile upon us, which is meant by the day, or adversity smite us, which agrees with the figure of night, at all times our adversary is at hand, who ceases not to trouble our way by temptations.

Consider also that Christ dwells among the wild beasts as man, but, as God, uses the ministry of Angels. Thus, when in the solitude of a holy life we bear with unpolluted mind the bestial manners of men, we merit to have the ministry of Angels, by whom, when freed from the body, we shall be transferred to everlasting happiness.

Lectio Divina – Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Catena Aurea, Mk 1:29-39, Sunday 6B

The Venerable Bede (672/3-735), in Marc., i, 9: And because the Lord said that He came “not to destroy the Law but to fulfill,” (Matt. 5:17) he who was excluded by the Law, inferring that he was cleansed by the power of the Lord, showed that grace, which could wash away the stain of the leper, was not from the Law, but over the Law. And truly, as in the Lord authoritative power is shown, so in him the constancy of faith is shown.

For there follows: “Lord, if you wish, you can make me clean.” He falls on his face, which is at once a gesture of lowliness and of shame, to show that every man should blush for the stains of his life. But his shame did not stifle confession; he showed his wound, and begged for medicine, and the confession is full of devotion and of faith, for he refers the power to the will of the Lord.

Theophylact of Ochrid (1055-1107): For he said not, If you wish, pray unto God, but, “If you wish,” as thinking Him true God.

St. John Chrysostom (c. 347-407), Hom. in Matt., 25:  Further, the reason why He touches the leper, and did not confer health upon him by word alone, was, that it is said by Moses in the Law, that he who touches a leper shall be unclean till the evening; that is, that he might show that this uncleanness is a natural one, that the Law was not laid down for Him, but on account of mere men. Furthermore, He shows that He Himself is the Lord of the Law; and the reason why He touched the leper, though the touch was not necessary to the working of the cure, was to show that He gives health, not as a servant, but as the Lord.

The Venerable Bede (672/3-735): Another reason why He touched him, was to proved that He could not be defiled, who free others from pollution.

And now it may well be asked why our Lord ordered His action to be concealed, and yet it could not be kept hidden for an hour? But we can see that the reason why, in doing a miracle, He ordered it to be kept secret, and yet for all that it was shouted abroad, was so that His elect, following the example of His teaching, should wish indeed that in the great things which they do, they should remain concealed, but should nevertheless unwillingly be brought to light for the good of others. Not then that He wished anything to be done which He was not able to bring about. But, by the authority of His teaching, He gave an example of what His members ought to wish for, and of what should happen to them even against their will.

Light of Truth – 54

This week on the Light of Truth Fr. Luuk Jansen OP talks with bro. Philip Mulryne OP about Marian apparitions. The Feast of Our Lady of Lourdes is on the 11th of February, so this week the Light of Truth looks at the apparitions of Our Lady to St. Bernadette.

Please send any comments or any question to lightoftruth@dominicans.ie and we will take them into account in the programs to come.

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Solemn Profession of Sr Cathy O.P.

Below are some photos of the Solemn Profession of sister Cathy, which took place on the 2nd of February 2018, the Feast of the Presentation. Sister Cathy made her Solemn vows as a Dominican Contemplative Nun in the Siena Monestry in Drogheda.

Vocations Icon – Galway

The latest stop of the Vocations Icon, an Icon of St. Dominic, is in Galway. After Newbridge College, Dundalk, Newry and Sligo the Icon moved this last weekend to our priory and church in the Claddagh in Galway.

The main aim of bringing the icon around the Irish Province is to encourage the congregation to pray for vocations. Prayer is the most important aspect of vocations promotion which is very clear from the “Year of Praying for Vocations”. A few years ago the Church celebrated a year of praying for vocations and the great response which came as a result proves that the Lord is always listening to our prayers.

Please join us in prayer for vocations.


Lord Jesus,
as once you called Saint Dominic to preach the Gospel,
so now, through the intercession of Our Blessed Lady, Queen of the Most Holy Rosary, and patroness of the Order,
we ask you to send new preachers into your harvest.

Give them the graces necessary to preach with wisdom and courage.
May they be witnesses to your life, death and resurrection, bringing the light of the true faith into the darkness of people’s lives.
You who live and reign for ever and ever.

Amen


 

Lectio Divina – Fifth Sunday in Ordinary time

Attributed to St. John Chrysostom: But the disciples, because they knew that they were to receive his goodness, without waiting for the evening, asked that Peter’s mother should be healed.

The Venerable Bede (672/3-735): The health which is conferred at the command of the Lord, returns at once entire, accompanied with such strength that she is able to minister to those of whose help she had before stood in need.

The Venerable Bede (672/3-735): In a mystical sense, the setting of the sun signifies the suffering and death of Him, who said, “As long as I am in the world, I am the light of the world.” (John 9:5) And when the sun was going down, more demoniacs and sick persons were healed than before: because while He lived in the flesh for a time he taught a few Jews, but he has transmitted the gifts of faith and health to all the Gentiles throughout the world. Again, mystically if by the setting of the sun, the death of the Saviour is intended, why should not His resurrection be intended by the returning dawn? For by its clear light, He went far into the wilderness of the Gentiles, and there continued praying in the person of His faithful disciples.

Theophylact of Ochrid (1055-1107): After that the Lord had cured the sick, He departed into a desert place. By this He taught us not to do any thing for the sake of appearance, but if we do any good, not to proclaim it openly. For He shows to us that we ought to attribute to God whatever we do well, and to say to Him, “Every good gift comes down from above,” (James 1:17) from Thee.

Attributed to St. John Chrysostom: In which word, He manifests the mystery of His “emptying himself,” (cf. Phil. 2:7-8) that is, of His incarnation, and the sovereignty of His divine nature, in that He here asserts, that He came willingly into the world. Luke however says, “To this end was I sent,” proclaiming the good pleasure of God the Father concerning the Incarnation of the Son.